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27th October
2011
written by Bstefan

Revealed – the capitalist network that runs the world – physics-math – 19 October 2011 – New Scientist

Image: PLoS OneAn analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy.

The study’s assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable.

The study, by a trio of complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, is the first to go beyond ideology to empirically identify such a network of power. It combines the mathematics long used to model natural systems with comprehensive corporate data to map ownership among the world’s transnational corporations (TNCs).

“Reality is so complex, we must move away from dogma, whether it’s conspiracy theories or free-market,” says James Glattfelder. “Our analysis is reality-based.”

Read the full article at the NewScientist, enlightening. Having studied complexity theory and network theory myself I am not surprised. Without any dogma I agree with the authors “such structures are common in nature”. I would assume a classic Pareto or power law distribution in practice. Nevertheless as economy is a social construct and not a natural pattern, we might be able to design it, if we understand it.

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11th October
2011
written by Bstefan

I had a wonderful, but short experience giving my first online presentation to students at the Adelphi University, New York. I was invited by Pamela Buckle to introduce the Change the Game Initiative as well as some trends in social responsible business and sustainability in Europe and the global major shifts to her BA students in organizational behavior. While some of the students looked pretty puzzled at me (thanks to this wonderful technologies bridging the world) there are some trends developing in the midst of New York that even puzzle me.

Who could have ever imagined the development of the Occupy Wall Street Movement as it is covered in online as well as mainstream media? I followed the analysis on Fast Company.

And soon after I followed the profile of the documentary director Alex Mallis and watched another puzzling documentation. I never thought that there would be a food coop in New York making 40 million USD in 2010 (which is according to the documentary 10 millions more than an average Whole Foods) and providing the neighborhood with healthy and affordable food.

I guess, if necessary we people are not only innovative but also entrepreneurs “by nature”. It seems, that all we need are some like minded fellows sometimes to create the new models that will make the existing models obsolete.

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30th May
2011
written by Bstefan

Do More With Less Or Things Will Get Ugly: Study | Fast Company

Ethonomic Indicator of the Day: 140 billion tons–the amount of resources the global economy will consume in 2050.
Mad Max 

As it stands, economic growth is largely dependent on resource consumption […] decoupling needs to begin on a large scale, and fast.

Will we really be innovative enough?

 

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24th May
2011
written by Bstefan

April was indeed a great month. Next to the invitation from the 31st PODIM Conference on Entrepreneurship and Innovation “Driving forces of creating global ventures”, I also enjoyed an invitation from the InCo movement Slovenia on April 21st.

The International InCo Conference 2011 “THE POWER OF INNOVATIVE ECOSYSTEMS” was held in the the National Council of the Republic of Slovenia. This was the second opportunity to meet inspiring people in this extraordinary environment after our coop-event InCo/Change The Game initiative in the National Council 2010.

It was an honor to be amongst the speakers Violeta Bulc, MBA, Vibacom and INCO movement initiative; Blaž Kavčič,  President of the National Council of the Republic of Slovenia; Andreja Kodrin, Challenge: FUTURE; Madan Mohan Rao, P.Hd; David NordFors: Innovation Journalism; and many more. My talk on “The Conscious Need for Innovation and Design. Why Ethonomics is crucial locally and globally” is available at prezi.com and videolectures.net.

UPDATE: The Proceedings have been published online (ISBN 978-961-91806-1-7)

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2nd May
2011
written by Bstefan

April was a great month. I visited Slovenia the second time. Together with my co-author and friend Prof. Thomas Wallner from the Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences I enjoyed an invitation from the 31st PODIM Conference on Entrepreneurship and Innovation “Driving forces of creating global ventures”. On April 21st our talk and paper on “Innovative entrepreneurship education: From aversion to excitement – how to win over students who see themselves as future employees” was well received.

The paper argues the necessity of new ways of educating entrepreneurship in an environment that is, and with students who are averse to entrepreneurship. We need to shift our focus from business administration or management responsibilities and tasks to the business innovation and design process, which is at the core and the critical success factor of every new venture. By offering learning designs that stimulate our students reasoning and touch their emotions, we strengthen their capabilities to express their desires and find radical innovations to meet unexpected desires of others. The paper summarizes the design of an ongoing learning experience that walks the talk and thus succeeds in bringing back the mojo to the class room; a class room which is transformed into an innovation hub by the students.

The paper describes this design in detail and reflects our personal learning experience with the prototyping of our own learning lab. Our most important learning: The design itself is not restricted to the class room environment. We have now elaborated a pattern language from this three years experience to transfer the design principles and methods to any venture design. I am looking forward to elaborate this pattern language further more and publish a field book in the near future.

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